Chad States “Night Sweats”

 

The Form Review is a simple attempt to increase dialogue within art journalism and highlight the subjectivity of a traditional exhibition review.  Artists/curators/responsible parties of an exhibition are invited to respond to five short prompts.  In turn, a representative of the St.Claire views the exhibition and independently responds to the same five prompts.  Both sets of “form answers” are published in tandem on the St.Claire website. To participate drop us a line at hark@the-st-claire.com

chad_states(IMAGE: Night Sweats, 2013. Image courtesy of Chade States)

 

form_review_eye1 Responses by Chad States, Artist

 1. What is hidden in this exhibition?  What is in plain sight?

The ceiling. Warm bodies.

 

2. Who would be this exhibition’s parents?  What might it’s children look like?

Aliester Crowley and Everett True. Beautiful, but only to the parents.

 

3. Describe one moment in this exhibition.

anxiety

 

4. This exhibition answers the following question:

Who is touching my leg?

 

5. You should message this exhibition if…

you aren’t satisfied in your current relationship

 

form_review_eye2Responses by Matt Kalasky, Editor, The St.Claire

1. What is hidden in this exhibition?  What is in plain sight?

This room is purposeful but its motives remain hidden in shadow. Here are my best guesses: developing, tanning, saving, sinning, singing, skinning, sinking, mourning, hiding, dying, flying. The obviousness of the other thing is palpable. You can not miss it. I would say you could not resist it, but I did. The desire to lay your body on their bodies and burn in the light. The desire to lay your body on their bodies and burn in the night. To be the live conductor between the hands, the heat, the ecclesiasticism, and the wet below and the raw power above. To feel the current.

 

2. Who would be this exhibition’s parents?  What might it’s children look like?

This exhibition was born of the photography darkroom. A dim and potentially sinister workshop where images appear and meaning is developed. A place where The Light is ostracized for fear of its scorching exposure. It takes time to get used to this place. For your eyes to adjust. For your body to adjust. The children hate their parents. Hate that they must live in their world. Hate that they love them so much. Hate that someday they might become them. Hate that they will make the same mistakes.

 

3. Describe one moment in this exhibition.

When either leaving or entering you catch yourself endlessly reflected in two facing mirrors. An infinite amount of yous casting an infinite amount of stare. As a passage I want it to prime and cleanse my cognitive palate. To act as as an aperitif and digestif to the den beyond. Instead, it seems each reflection initiates an internal reckoning. Who is this person? What am I about to do? What did I just do? I imagine mirrors at bars get this all the time. As a purgatory moment it demands honesty for those actions that lay behind you and those yet to be committed.

 

4. This exhibition answers the following question:

What kind of mess is that towel going to clean up? What kind of mess is that towel covering up?

 

5.  You should message this exhibition if…

you can make this night last forever.

Chad States “Night Sweats”
chadstates.com

ON VIEW:
February 2 – February 23, 2014
Gallery Hours: Saturdays and Sundays 2pm – 6pm or by appointment

NAPOLEON
319 N 11th Street, 2L
Philadelphia, PA
napoleonnapoleon.com